Leadership Ideas, Information and News

Saturday, July 12, 2008

Become a Private Investigator

July, 12, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On July 18, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Jimmie Mesis on how to become a private investigator.

Program Date: July 18, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Become a Private Investigator
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/19/Become-a-Private-Investigator

About the Guest
Jimmie Mesis is probably one the most recognized and respected
private investigators throughout the United States and abroad. For the last 28 years, he has created and sold numerous companies related to the field of investigations including several investigative agencies that have generated millions of dollars in revenue. He currently owns a marketing consulting firm, several Internet based companies including his latest venture, PI Gear, a discount surveillance equipment company.

However, he and his investigator wife, Rosemarie are best known as the owners of PI Magazine, the only international trade publication of
private investigators. In less than 4 years the magazine has grown from less than 1,000 readers to over 30,000 readers with subscribers in 22 countries. Jimmie Mesis is the recipient of numerous awards including, Investigator of the Year Award, Speaker of the Year, and the recipient of the Hal Lipset Award for Investigative Excellence presented to him by the World Association of Detectives.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, July 06, 2008

Become a Police Officer

June 13, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On July 11, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Lieutenant Barry Baker, Baltimore Police Department (ret.), on how to become a police officer.

Program Date: July 11, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Become a Police Officer
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/12/Become-a-Police-Officer

About the Guest
Detective Lieutenant
Barry Baker retired from the Baltimore Police Department in 2004. During his thirty-two year career, Barry Baker served as a patrol officer, sergeant, and lieutenant, as well as a special operations lieutenant and detective lieutenant. Lieutenant Barry Baker is the author of Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider's Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement.

According to
Barry Baker’s book, Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement “is a serious examination of police work that is directed toward young people who are contemplating a career as a police officer. Author Barry Baker draws on over thirty-two years of experience from some of the most violent streets of any city in the United States to show you the unembellished truths of law enforcement.

Barry Baker describes the self-satisfaction that can be found in police work while identifying its pitfalls and how to avoid them. Before ending his career as a detective lieutenant, Baker spent his first twenty years on the force as a patrol officer, making him uniquely qualified to speak from a breadth and depth of experience.

Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in
Law Enforcement covers topics a newly trained police officer must appreciate—and master—to ensure success and safety, including the following: Self-evaluation for a police career; Recognizing and ignoring bad advice; Rapid advancement toward self-sufficiency; The immeasurable importance of integrity; and, Matters of life and death.

Becoming a
Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement is a valuable insight for those seeking a career in the honorable and important profession of law enforcement.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, July 03, 2008

Program Gives Senior Officials 21st Century Skill Sets

By Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

July 1, 2008 - A new Defense Department program for senior-level civilians seeks to develop the skills and competencies needed to lead the 21st century national defense effort. The Defense Senior
Leader Development Program, which replaces the current Defense Leadership and Management Program, is the new "premiere executive development program for senior defense civilians and a key component of the department's succession planning strategy," said Patricia Bradshaw, deputy undersecretary of defense for civilian personnel policy.

"Civilians are playing a much greater role alongside our warfighters," she said. "Today, they are on the front lines, and civilians, including [Defense Department] civilians, have a role in reconstruction phases as well as other areas on today's battlefield."

The new program targets already-successful senior
leaders needing to strengthen their knowledge of national security and broaden their enterprise view, Bradshaw said. Experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as Hurricane Katrina, shown the need for senior-level training to evolve beyond the Defense Department into the multinational and interagency world of the State Department, nongovernmental organizations and country allies, Bradshaw said.

As the U.S. aids the Iraqi government, for example, civilian teams from the U.S. Defense and State departments are working alongside
military personnel assisting in rebuilding Iraq's ministries. Civilians are advising Iraqi officials on areas ranging from rule of law and economics to government and education, she said.

"Civilians are called upon to serve in ways we have not in the past," she said. "So it's not only the basic competencies we need to focus on; it's the ability to lead in our environment and make decisions."

Efforts such as the new training program will give senior civilians the tools they need to be successful in environments such as Iraq, Bradshaw said.

The need for the new program was recognized in 2005, and it was approved in 2007. Nominations for the first class, which begins in February, are due in September, and up to 50 people will be selected by December, said David A. Rude, chief of senior
leader development, Civilian Personnel Management Service.

Individuals participating in DLAMP all received a letter last year explaining that the program would end in fiscal 2010. They must complete all program requirements to apply for completion, Rude said.

Graduates from the previous program aren't eligible for the new one; however, supplementary courses, training and seminars are available to help them, as well as those who don't get into the new program, become more competitive, Bradshaw said. Eventually, department employees will be able to go online and see what kind of
leadership seminars and courses are available and how they map to a particular leadership competency, she added.

Those selected for the new program can expect four weeklong seminars, participation in case studies and 10 months of
military education at one of the five war colleges to give them a broader sense of national security and working side by side with servicemembers, Bradshaw said.

Each service component will implement its own process requirements for how individuals are nominated. Basic eligibility requirements for the two-year program are:

-- Permanent, full-time Defense Department civilian employee at National Security Personnel System Pay Band 3, or GS-14/15 and equivalent;

--
Bachelor's degree as required to attend professional military education at one of the five service war colleges; and

-- One year of supervisory experience, which may be waived upon component recommendation.

An hourlong town hall meeting about the new program will be held at the Pentagon Conference Center at 8:30 a.m. July 8. The meeting will stream on the Civilian Personnel Management Service Web site for those who cannot attend in person.